[Openvas-commits] r1469 - trunk/openvas-compendium

scm-commit@wald.intevation.org scm-commit at wald.intevation.org
Tue Sep 30 10:24:05 CEST 2008


Author: mwiegand
Date: 2008-09-30 10:24:04 +0200 (Tue, 30 Sep 2008)
New Revision: 1469

Modified:
   trunk/openvas-compendium/ChangeLog
   trunk/openvas-compendium/openvas-compendium.tex
Log:
* openvas-compendium.tex: Fixed several typos.


Modified: trunk/openvas-compendium/ChangeLog
===================================================================
--- trunk/openvas-compendium/ChangeLog	2008-09-30 08:05:38 UTC (rev 1468)
+++ trunk/openvas-compendium/ChangeLog	2008-09-30 08:24:04 UTC (rev 1469)
@@ -1,5 +1,9 @@
 2008-09-30  Michael Wiegand <michael.wiegand at intevation.de>
 
+	* openvas-compendium.tex: Fixed several typos.
+
+2008-09-30  Michael Wiegand <michael.wiegand at intevation.de>
+
 	* openvas-compendium.tex: Updated SLAD plugins section, made
 	installation instructions more generic, typo fixes.
 

Modified: trunk/openvas-compendium/openvas-compendium.tex
===================================================================
--- trunk/openvas-compendium/openvas-compendium.tex	2008-09-30 08:05:38 UTC (rev 1468)
+++ trunk/openvas-compendium/openvas-compendium.tex	2008-09-30 08:24:04 UTC (rev 1469)
@@ -124,7 +124,7 @@
 for all aspects of network vulnerability scanning with OpenVAS.
 
 This ranges from instructions on how to use the OpenVAS-Client graphical user
-interface, run specific test methods and write NASL vulnerability tests upto
+interface, run specific test methods and write NASL vulnerability tests up to
 details on the internal architecture of the actual scan server software.
 
 This compendium is permanently improved and extended.
@@ -149,14 +149,14 @@
 
 OpenVAS stands for Open Vulnerability Assessment System and represents a comprehensive
 tool-chain for network security scanning including a graphical user front-end
-and incorporating various third-party security applicaitons. The core is a
+and incorporating various third-party security applications. The core is a
 server component with a set of Network Vulnerability Tests (NVTs) to detect
 security problems in remote systems and applications.
 
 The OpenVAS development team consists of various intersted
-parties from academia and commercial entitites as well as indiviuals.
+parties from academia and commercial entities as well as individuals.
 The majority of the team members has a long professional record
-in security consulting and/or software developement.
+in security consulting and/or software development.
 
 The OpenVAS project is open for new members.
 Formal processes exist only where helpful, e.g. getting
@@ -1011,7 +1011,7 @@
 \item \verb|openvasd-config|: compile parameters for modules that use openvas-server
 \item \verb|openvas-mkcert-client|: a tool for generating client certificates
 \item \verb|openvas-nasl|: a standalone NASL interpreter for users who want to test
-  a NASL skript for syntax errors.
+  a NASL script for syntax errors.
 \item \verb|OpenVAS-Client|: The graphical user interface.
 % TODO: Is this worth mentioning or will it be removed anyway eventually?
 % \item \verb|openvas-mkrand|:
@@ -1057,8 +1057,8 @@
 \item \verb|openvas-adduser|: Routine to add a OpenVAS user.
 \item \verb|openvas-mkcert|: Routine to create a server certificate.
 \item \verb|openvas-rmuser|: Routine to remove a OpenVAS user.
-\item \verb|openvas-check-signature|: Routine to check singatures on NVTs.
-\item \verb|openvas-nvt-sync|: Routine for synchronisation with NVT Feeds.
+\item \verb|openvas-check-signature|: Routine to check signatures on NVTs.
+\item \verb|openvas-nvt-sync|: Routine for synchronization with NVT Feeds.
 \end{itemize}
 
 \xname{usr-local-share-man}
@@ -1071,7 +1071,7 @@
 \section{Manual pages for server (PREFIX/man)}
 
 This directory contains the standard unixoid manual pages for the individual executables
-relevant for OpenVAS administation.
+relevant for OpenVAS administration.
 
 \xname{usr-local-var-lib-openvas}
 \section{Server installation specific data (PREFIX/var/lib/openvas)}
@@ -1080,7 +1080,7 @@
 
 \begin{itemize}
 
-\item \verb|CA|: Public certitificates created for OpenVAS Server SSL connections.
+\item \verb|CA|: Public certificates created for OpenVAS Server SSL connections.
 
 \item \verb|private/CA|: Corresponding private certificates.
 
@@ -1430,7 +1430,7 @@
 
 \paragraph{Save As}
 
-Saves the current scope to a file (which is of nessusrc type). Note
+Saves the current scope to a file (which is of openvasrc type). Note
 that only the parameter sets are stored but not the reports. See above
 the description of {}``Open'' for more hints.
 
@@ -1554,7 +1554,7 @@
 this certificate you will be able to check that you are connecting to a trusted
 OpenVAS server. This is checked if you have the ``Paranoia Level'' set
 to 2 or 3 and is is not checked with a ``Paranoia Level'' of 1. Note that
-you can set the Paranoia Level by hand in the nessusrc files or when
+you can set the Paranoia Level by hand in the openvasrc files or when
 first connecting to an OpenVAS server where you are asked explicitly.
 
 The default path for the Trusted CA is the filename used by the OpenVAS server
@@ -1838,7 +1838,7 @@
 will not scan them.
 
  \item[Only test hosts that have never been tested in the past] Another way of
-using the existance of KBs is to exclude all hosts that have already been
+using the existence of KBs is to exclude all hosts that have already been
 scanned. This way a scan will automatically discover hosts that have been added
 to the network since the last scan. Be aware that this setting cause hosts to
 be scanned only once (the first time they appear on the network), meaning you
@@ -1847,7 +1847,7 @@
 
  \item[Reuse the knowledge bases about the hosts for the tests] This setting
 controls if the server should restore the KB that was saved for this host during
-the last scan. The default behaviour is to create a new KB every time a host is
+the last scan. The default behavior is to create a new KB every time a host is
 scan and to replace an existing KB with the new results.
 
  \item[Do not execute scanners that have already been executed] If the server
@@ -2319,7 +2319,7 @@
 \subsection{SLAD plugins}
 
 As shown above, the sladd is just a program to run other programs from inside a
-daemon and provide an unififed interface to their output. The current package of
+daemon and provide an unified interface to their output. The current package of
 SLAD contains the following plugins:
 
 \subsubsection{chkrootkit}
@@ -2356,7 +2356,7 @@
 
 \subsubsection{lsof}
 
-The unix system utility lsof simply shows a list of files currently open on the
+The Unix system utility lsof simply shows a list of files currently open on the
 system and which program uses them. This can assist an administrator to find
 unusual activity on the system.
 
@@ -2366,14 +2366,14 @@
 checks the suite can perform four groups have been created. These are:
 
 \begin{description}
-\item[Users:] The users check covers accounts, checks for mail aliases, ftp
+\item[Users:] The users check covers accounts, checks for mail aliases, FTP
 login users and the like.
 \item[Permission:] This selection checks users and group access permissions on
 device nodes, logfiles and other important files and directories.
 \item[Config:] This script checks for weaknesses and mistakes in common system
 and application specific configuration files.
 \item[System:] The system check looks for open deleted files, processes that are
-waiting for incoming connections, and other ``unsual'' things.
+waiting for incoming connections, and other ``unusual'' things.
 \item[Full system check:] This runs all of the above checks.
 \end{description}
 
@@ -2572,7 +2572,7 @@
 The first version of NASL (also known as NASL1) was created in 1998 by Renaud
 Deraison. In 2002, Michel Arboi and Renaud Deraison developed an improved NASL
 parser which extended the range of built-in functions and operators. This
-improved version is generally refered to as NASL2.
+improved version is generally referred to as NASL2.
 
 If not indicated otherwise, this compendium describes NASL2 as it is
 implemented in OpenVAS.
@@ -4271,7 +4271,7 @@
 
 \paragraph{Starting a scan}
 NTP offered two ways of starting a scan, \verb|NEW_ATTACK| and
-\verb|LONG_ATTACK|. The latter allowed arbitray long list of targets while the
+\verb|LONG_ATTACK|. The latter allowed arbitrary long list of targets while the
 first was limited to 4000 bytes. The OpenVAS-Client (and so did NessusClient)
 used only \verb|LONG_ATTACK| anyway.
 
@@ -4344,7 +4344,7 @@
 \paragraph{Description:}
 This command is used by the server to indicate that a scan session has finished.
 
-The client is expected to acknowlegde this command.
+The client is expected to acknowledge this command.
 
 \paragraph{Syntax:}
 
@@ -4716,7 +4716,7 @@
  \item [save\_session] If set to yes, the server will save the scan as a
 session.
  \item [save\_empty\_sessions] Only considered if save\_session is set to "yes".
-If set to "yes" even emtpy scans will be saved a session.
+If set to "yes" even empty scans will be saved a session.
  \item [max\_threads] 
  \item [test\_file] 
  \item [ping\_hosts] 



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